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Bruno Bosteels

Professor

Overview

Bruno Bosteels, Professor of Romance Studies. PhD in Romance Languages and Literatures from the University of Pennsylvania (1995; MA 1992), AB in Romance Philology from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium (1989). Before coming to Cornell, he held positions as an assistant professor at Harvard University and at Columbia University. He is the author of Alain Badiou, une trajectoire polémique (La Fabrique, 2009); Badiou and Politics(Duke University Press, 2011); and The Actuality of Communism (Verso, 2011). He is currently preparing two new books, Marx and Freud in Latin Americaand After Borges: Literature and Antiphilosophy. He has translated Alain Badiou’s Theory of the Subject(Continuum, 2009). Further translations include Badiou’s Can Politics Be Thought? followed by Of an Obscure Disaster: On the End of the Truth of State and What Is Antiphilosophy? Essays on Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Lacan (both for Duke University Press) as well as Wittgenstein’s Antiphilosophy (for Verso). He is the author of dozens of articles on modern Latin American literature and culture, and on contemporary European philosophy and political theory. His research interests further include the crossovers between art, literature, theory and cartography; the radical movements of the 1960s and 1970s; decadence, dandyism and anarchy at the turn between the 19th and 20th centuries; cultural studies and critical theory; and the reception of Marx and Freud in Latin America. He has also served as the general editor of Diacritics.

Research Focus

  • The Cartographic Turn: Mapping Art, Literature and Critical Theory Since 1950
  • The Radical Left in the 1960s and 1970s
  • Decadence, Dandyism and Anarchy at the Turn of the Century (1880-1910)
  • Cultural Studies and Critical Theory
  • Contemporary Philosophy: Thinking the Event
  • Theories of the Subject
  • The Thought of Alain Badiou
  • Marx and Freud in Latin America
  • Legacies of Jorge Luis Borges

Departments/Programs

  • Romance Studies

Graduate Fields

  • Comparative Literature
  • Latin American Studies
  • Romance Studies

Publications

Books:

  • Badiou and Politics (Duke University Press, forthcoming).
  • After Borges: Literature and Antiphilosophy (Duke University Press, forthcoming).

Selected Articles:

  • “Out of Site: Gego, Uneven Modernity, and the Limits of Freedom.” Thinking the Line: Gego. Ed. Nadja Rottner and Peter Weibel (2006).
  • “Truth and Terror: Politics, Psychoanalysis and Religion in the Philosophy of León Rozitchner.” Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies (in preparation).
  • “Nothing is Everything: Elements for a Renewal of the Materialist Dialectic.” The Nothing(ness)/Le rien/das Nichts. Ed. Alenka Zupančič. Special issue of Filozofski vestnik (2005).
  • “Literatura, economía, política (fragmentos).” La crítica: revistas literarias, académicas y culturales. Special issue of Revista de Crítica Cultural 31 (2005): 18-23.
  • “The Speculative Left.” Thinking Politically. Ed. Alberto Moreiras. Special issue of South Atlantic Quarterly (2005).
  • “Economía literaria y economía general.” Encuentro de la literatura argentina con el discurso crítico. XII Congreso Nacional de Literatura Argentina. Ed. Marcela Arpes and Nora Ricaud. Río Gallegos: Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, 2005. 11-27.
  • “Non-Places: An Anecdoted Topography of Recent Critical Theory.” Special issue edited by Bob Davidson and Joan Ramon Resina. Diacritics (in preparation).
  • “Post-Maoism: Badiou and Politics.” positions: east asia culture critique 13.3 (2005).
  • “El comunismo invariante o la acumulación de la crítica.” Crítica de la acumulación. Ed. Oscar Cabezas and Alessandro Fornazzari (Santiago de Chile: LOM, forthcoming).
  • “A Misreading of Maps: The Politics of Cartography in Marxism and Poststructuralism.” Signs of Change: Premodern, Modern, Postmodern. Ed. Stephen Barker (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996). 109-138.
  • (With Loris Mirella and Peter Schilling) “The Politics of Totality in Magic Realism.” Challenging Boundaries: Global Flows, Territorial Identities. Eds. Michael Shapiro and Hayward R. Alker (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996). 111-133.
  • “From Text to Diagram: Towards a Semiotics of Cultural Cartography.” Semiotics '94. Ed. C. W. Spinks (New York: Peter Lang, 1995). 347-359.
  • Translations:
  • Can Politics Be Thought? (Peut-on penser la politique?) followed by Of An Obscure Disaster: The End of the Truth of State (D’un désastre obscur: Sur la fin de la vérité d’Etat), by Alain Badiou (Durham: Duke University Press, in preparation)
  • What Is Antiphilosophy? Essays on Nietzsche, Wittgenstein and Lacan, by Alain Badiou (Durham: Duke University Press, in preparation)

Edition:

  • Los nuevos sujetos de la política. Ed. Bruno Bosteels. Special issue of Metapolítica 8.36 (July-August 2004). Essays and contributions by Alain Badiou, Jean Franco, Jacques Rancière, Slavoj ?i?ek, Josefina Ludmer, John Kraniauskas, Alain Touraine, and Raúl J. Cerdeiras. Electronic version includes additional contributions by Alberto Moreiras, Gareth Williams, John Beverley, and Peter Hallward. Available on the Web: http://www.metapolitica.com.mx/36/dosscompleto.htm
  • He is currently preparing two book manuscripts, After Borges: Literature and Antiphilosophy and Badiou and Politics (forthcoming from Duke University Press). He is also translating and introducing two books by Badiou: Can Politics Be Thought? followed by An Obscure Disaster: On the End of the Truth of State and What Is Antiphilosophy? Essays on Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, and Lacan (both for Duke University Press). He is the author of dozens of articles on modern Latin American literature and culture, and on contemporary European philosophy and political theory.